Add Product

Search Results:

Reply
Highlighted
Posts: 8,547
Topics: 232
Kudos: 154
Blog Posts: 89
Solutions: 422
Registered: ‎09-29-2008

iPod Battery FAQ

[ Edited ]

Hey everyone,

 

For many people their iPod is a constant companion. It’s there for them at work, at the gym, on the road, and anywhere else they happen to be. You’d be surprised to learn then how little some might know about their iPod – and its battery. To help those consumers out we’ve compiled a Q&A that addresses some of the most commonly-asked questions:

What kind of battery does my iPod have?
All iPods feature a built-in, rechargeable Lithium-Ion battery.

How long will my battery last?
All rechargeable batteries are rated for a set number of charge cycles – that’s the number of times you can fully drain and recharge the battery without seeing any adverse effects. The more frequently you need to charge your iPod then the shorter the battery’s lifespan is likely to be. Apple specifically states that “a properly maintained iPod battery is designed to retain up to 80% of its original capacity at 400 full charge and discharge cycles,” so assuming you only need to recharge your iPod once a week you can typically expect your battery to last 6-8 years before it needs to be replaced.

How long should I charge my battery?
Charging times may vary from model to model, so it’s generally best to refer to your owner’s manual documentation for model-specific information. Remember though that playing music, watching videos, or adding files while the unit is charging may result in a longer charging time!

How long will a full charge last?
The answer to this question depends upon which type of iPod you own, as well as upon how you use it. For a basic model-by-model overview check out the following link:

http://www.apple.com/batteries/ipods.html

How do I replace my iPod’s battery?
All iPods feature an internal, non-user-replaceable battery, so when your battery is no longer capable of holding a charge you’ll need to contact Apple directly or a factory authorized service provider (such your local Best Buy
® store) to have it replaced.

 

Hope this helps you out!

Message Edited by Aaron-GS on 05-11-2009 10:22 AM
Aaron|Social Media Specialist | Best Buy® Corporate
Posts: 8,547
Topics: 232
Kudos: 154
Blog Posts: 89
Solutions: 422
Registered: ‎09-29-2008

Common Battery Types & Their Uses

[ Edited ]
Alkaline Batteries
Often referred to as “long life” batteries, alkaline batteries are available in both disposable and rechargeable variants. Their primary application is in devices that require high currents of several amps, such as portable radios and high-powered flashlights. Initially developed in the 1960’s, alkaline batteries are unique in that they may generally be disposed of as regular household waste in most locations. Some states, however, consider them to be hazardous waste and may impose restrictions on their disposal.

Lead-Acid Batteries
Lead-acid batteries are the oldest type of rechargeable battery. Invented in 1859, lead-acid batteries are most frequently used in devices that require large surge currents to operate such as vehicle starter motors, emergency lightning, and universal power supplies. Disposal and recycling methods vary from state to state, but it is estimated that over 95% of all battery lead is recycled thanks to nationwide programs and legislation.

Lithium Batteries
The phrase “lithium battery” does not describe a specific chemical composition, but instead describes an entire family of chemistries. These disposable batteries may be used in place of standard alkaline batteries in many devices, and while they may be more expensive than their alkaline counterparts they tend to last much longer. Lithium batteries are commonly used in portable electronics, watches, calculators, remote car locks, and as backup batteries in computers. While they may generally be disposed of as alkaline batteries, lithium battery recycling programs are rapidly growing due to the value of their recoverable materials and how easily they may be handled compared to other battery types.

Lithium Ion (Li-Ion) Batteries
Lithium Ion batteries are a type of rechargeable battery typically used with portable consumer electronics, such as digital cameras, watches, camcorders, MP3 players, laptop computers and cell phones. Some manufacturers have even started including them in hybrid vehicles, motorcycles and scooters. The earliest generation of Li-Ion batteries often required an excess of 2+ hours to reach a full charge, but the latest generation have proven to reach 90% of their maximum charge in as little as 10 minutes. The downside to Li-Ion technology, however, is that its service life is directly impacted by a battery’s age – battery capacity slowly declines over time regardless of how often it is charged.

Nickel-Metal Hydride (NiMH) Batteries
Nickel-Metal Hydride batteries are another widely available rechargeable alternative to alkaline batteries. Typically used in digital cameras and other high-tech gadgets like video game controllers, NiMH batteries can last up to 2-4 times longer than their alkaline counterparts in the same device. The downside is that not all devices will function properly when NiMH cells are substituted for alkaline batteries.

Nickel-Cadmium (NiCd) Batteries
Nickel-Cadmium batteries are another type of rechargeable battery that were primarily used in motorized equipment and other high-discharge, short-term devices. Originally developed in 1899, NiCd batteries were the first direct competition for lead-acid batteries. While they did not see the same wide-spread acceptance as lead-acid batteries in automobiles, they all but dominated the rechargeable battery market until alternatives were introduced in the late 1990’s. Li-Ion and NiMH have since replaced NiCd in most consumer electronics.
Message Edited by Aaron-GS on 05-11-2009 10:23 AM
Aaron|Social Media Specialist | Best Buy® Corporate